Keywords: How to Look Up as a Layman

Look up KEYWORDS for social media as a layman using several techniques

Look up keywords for social media and LinkedIn as a layman. There are many ways you can check to find keywords, whether you are employed, self-employed, unemployed, a veteran, or a student.

There are numerous ways to analyze keywords for your resume, LinkedIn profile, website, blog, social media posts, etc. Let’s review more tools!

In the previous article, I mentioned using the Jobs tab on the LinkedIn profile to look up keywords, as well as Google Trends

Below, we will explore some other ways, including using some keyword analyzers, such as the following (though there are many more):

Google AdWords

Intry

Jobscan.co 

KWFinder

Moz Keyword Explorer

SEMRush

SimilarWeb

SkillSyncer

WordArt

Wordstream

WordCloud Generators

Another way is to use the LinkedIn Resume Builder feature. When you are viewing your profile, click the MORE button, and BUILD A RESUME. Click on NEW RESUME (based on your LinkedIn profile) and enter your target job title. Click APPLY, and you will see the keyword check in the Resume Insights on the right-hand column, and it should also suggest some keywords for you. 

The LinkedIn Career Explorer tool is another way. You can enter a job, and it lists the skills needed for the job. Also, it lists the skill overlap, skills to build, popularity, and more.  

Now you have even more ways to check your keywords, and you can compare and contrast your findings, so spruce up your profile to optimize for 2021!

Need to participate in LinkedIn training workshops? Sign up for the third Saturday of every month at the library in 2021.  

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit with over 6700 members and alumni providing career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today

Keywords on LinkedIn: How to Check

How do you check your keywords on LinkedIn?

Keywords on LinkedIn: How do you check? This is a question asked all the time and several techniques to find keywords can be used whether you are employed, self-employed, unemployed, a veteran, or a student.

No matter what your status, you might want to optimize your LinkedIn profile with the best keywords if you want to be found.

If, for example, you are an attorney, like Hanan Isaacs, Esq., you could focus on keywords in the following areas:

HEADLINE of up to 220 characters: Central NJ Attorney | Family Law & Divorce | Employment Litigation | Alternative Dispute Resolution | Negotiations | Arbitrator | Discrimination | Civil Law | Trial Lawyer | Legal Advocacy | Business Disputes | Counsel

ABOUT section up to 2600 characters: Remove all the paragraphs, add white space for ease of skimming and scanning, and create bullet-pointed lists of keywords.

JOB TITLES embellished up to 100 characters: Senior Attorney | Arbitrator | Mediator | Trial Lawyer | Matrimonial Specialist | Employment Law

SKILLS & ENDORSEMENTS and you can have 50: Pin your top three and add 47 more. 

PROJECT AND PUBLICATIONS: It is not only the titles where you want to have keywords but also the descriptions.

So how can you find out which keyword might be better than another? One way is the Jobs tab on LinkedIn. You type in a keyword and use Greater Philadelphia Area, for example. Then look up different synonyms for the keyword and choose the best version.

You not only want to be found by using the most popular words, but you want to be found by the niche words where you have expertise. As they say, Riches in Niches!

You can also go on Google Trends and compare keywords for Philadelphia for different time frames – 1 month, 90 days, one year, and many more choices. My experience has been that Google Trends mirrors LinkedIn. If you keep all of your research in a spreadsheet (Excel or Google sheets), then you can sort them alphabetically or by most to least.

When I put clients into my system for keyword research, they have AHA moments when they look up some of the words they have used and realize they have deadwood in their profiles with words that are not doing them any good. 

So, as we are about to approach the holidays, start thinking about spring cleaning your LinkedIn profile while things might have slowed down a bit!

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit with over 6700 members and alumni providing career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today

How to Promote Your Side Hustle, Side Gig, or Freelance Work on LinkedIn

How do you promote your side hustle, side gig, or freelance work on LinkedIn? Optimize your profile with keywords!

Think like Google. What keywords would people type in to find the product you sell or service you provide at your side hustle, side gig, or freelance work? Do you have a company page on LinkedIn to promote yourself?

Many folks may want to give themselves a title like Owner or President or CEO of ABC Company, but is that the best thing to do? 

If someone does not yet know you or know your company, would they enter your company name in a Google search? Of course not! They would enter the keywords of what they are seeking. 

What if you were seeking a Brand Messaging Strategist? On Google, I searched and got 1.7M results.

When I entered that title on LinkedIn, I got 68,000 results for people. When I clicked on 1st and 2nd level connections, I got 8.8K people, and when I clicked on 1st level, I got 108 people. 

When I did a Boolean search (read this and that) on LinkedIn using quotation marks around “Brand Messaging Strategist” for 1st level connections, I got one person in my network – Loren Weisman. You might want to follow him on social media

Why am I singling out this guy? He recently spoke at our group and shared so many great ideas that the lightbulbs are exploding in my head, and I have to share a link with you. 

Check out the Interview Information Lead Sheet. Could you develop one of these for your business? Could you put this on your website? Could you create a LinkedIn document, Google slide presentation, PowerPoint, Word document, or Google doc with this info and put it on your LinkedIn profile as a media attachment? Yes, you could to showcase your features and benefits. 

Are you a speaker? Check out the content that Loren shared as part of his speaker BIO. Very impressive. Need to put a hashtag list together for yourself? Check out meta hashtags!

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, that provides career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today.

Leverage the LinkedIn Algorithm to Boost Your Personal and Business Profile
You can leverage the LinkedIn algorithm to boost you personal and business profile if you can keep up with its mysterious and ever-changing nature.

Some recent research from the Netherlands, as well as from a LinkedIn expert in Chicago, may help you with your LinkedIn strategy.

If you understand a little about the algorithm, you can leverage how you approach LinkedIn to build your business and/or profile.

Two connections in my network have shared the latest updates on the algorithm, and you may want to follow them, so they are in your feed – Richard van der Blom from the Netherlands, who did the research published in October 2020, and Andy Foote from Chicago who wrote a nice recap of this research as well as another article

I don’t need to reinvent the wheel, so below, I am just listing the main topics researched, so you know these are LinkedIn essentials that you need to understand better. 

  • Company page strategies
  • Content with the most success
  • Dwell Time
  • Engagement
  • Formating
  • Hashtags
  • Links (best to include in an edit after posting)
  • Likes vs. Comments vs. Share and Comments are King!
  • Social Selling Index Score
  • Tags
  • Times to post for best results
  • Videos 

As with all technology, it is ever-changing and sometimes hard to keep up. Hopefully, these few bits of information will help you optimize on the platform.

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit with over 6700 members and alumni providing career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today.

How to Set Up a LinkedIn Profile

How do you set up a profile on LinkedIn? It’s easy. Start with going to https://www.linkedIn.com and just begin.

With over 722+ million people on LinkedIn as part of the world’s largest business networking platform, many people are still not on it, so it’s time to jump on board. 

Click here for some screenshots and step-by-step instructions of a recent profile set up (with private information blacked out). 

Even though it is very intuitive and you read and follow the prompts provided, many people are still intimidated by the platform because they don’t know what they don’t know.

There are a few solutions for that so you can get LinkedIn and not be left out.

  1. Ask Google, “How do I set up a LinkedIn profile?”
  2. Search on YouTube
  3. Search on meetup and Eventbrite
  4. Join me at the monthly LinkedIn workshops on Zoom (limited to 100) on a Saturday from 10 AM to 1 PM. Believe it or not, the three hour workshops are free to you as a library patron, sponsored by the Friends of the Chester County Library. LinkedIn Part 3 is on Nov 28th, Part 1 on Dec 5th, Part 2 on Jan 16th, and then every third Sat after that in 2021. Click here to register. 

Upcoming November Online Zoom Events

Register per the instructions on the website. Join our meetup (see step one of this Google doc). To attend the speaker meetings for free for a year, become a Bronze or BENG member. Your membership or sponsorship supports our nonprofit to help job seekers in career transition and self-employed and employed with career management. Consider sponsoring a job seeker in need and help pay it forward!

  • 11/16 Career Success Group
  • 11/16 Virtual Job Seeker Support Meeting
  • 11/16 Business Executives Networking Group (BENG) Meeting
  • 11/17 Your Networking Toolbox
  • 11/17 Lehigh Valley Business Executives Networking Group
  • 11/18 PowerThinking Resiliency Building Call
  • 11/18 Job Market Outlook, Hiring and Onboarding
  • 11/18  Business Executives Networking Group (BENG) Meeting
  • 11/19 Q & A on Careers In Nonprofits
  • 11/19 Optimizing Your Resume
  • 11/19 Business Executives Networking Group (BENG) Meeting
  • 11/19 Beating the Applicant Tracking System
  • 11/20 Blogging to Tell Your Story

Author BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit that provides career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today.

Don't Risk Destroying Personal and Professional Relationships - Keep LinkedIn Politics-Free

DON'T RISK DESTROYING PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS - KEEP LINKEDIN POLITICS-FREE

DON'T RISK DESTROYING PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS - KEEP LINKEDIN POLITICS-FREE

I would recommend keeping LinkedIn Politics Free before and after election day. You could jeopardize relationships with your employer, clients, colleagues, etc.

If politics is your career, you will most likely be listing your position in the work experience section. However, be careful with your posts’ content, as you may reap what you sow – good, bad, and ugly. 

If you want to share your personal political opinions, LinkedIn is not the place for that. Read this Forbes article and Google to read more on this topic. There are many articles to read. 

LinkedIn’s Advertising Policies prohibit advertising many things, including political ads. Specifically, the policy states:

Political ads are prohibited, including ads advocating for or against a particular candidate, party, or ballot proposition or otherwise intended to influence an election outcome; ads fundraising for or by political candidates, parties, political action committees or similar organizations, or ballot propositions; and ads exploiting a sensitive political issue even if the advertiser has no explicit political agenda.”

If LinkedIn’s ad policy is so specific, I would think it would be wise to mirror that philosophy on your profile.

Note that LinkedIn also has Professional Community Policies as well as a User Agreement.  

Don’t create divisiveness. Don’t start what others have termed “LinkedIn suicide.” It’s not worth it. Your banter will probably not change anyone’s opinion anyway. 

Want to get involved in the polls? Temporary paid, and volunteer jobs are available in Chester County, Chester County, Delaware County, Montgomery County, or learn more here

Just as a reminder:

Last chance to RSVP for a John Maxwell event live on Oct 9th, 9 am – 1 pm or on-demand for five days after. Join in on presentations from John Maxwell, Steve Harvey, Alan Mullaly, Kat Cole, and Craig Groeschel. To learn from these world-class leaders, register on this link for only $79. 

Missed last week’s article Leveraging LinkedIn for Business Building Opportunities? Click here!

Need to learn more about building your LinkedIn profile? Register with the Chester County Library for Saturday, October 17, 2020, for LinkedIn Part 2 of 3. In this workshop, you will learn how to make the visuals and how your efforts on LinkedIn can connect on other social media platforms. 

Prefer Tuesday evenings for LinkedIn learning, join me on Zoom for five sessions! 

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit with over 6700 members and alumni providing career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today.

LinkedIn Image Sizes and Character Limits

Below is an overview of many of the more frequently used current LinkedIn image sizes and character limits that will allow you to plan in advance. When typing content, it’s always best to type in Word or other word processing program so you can more clearly see the red underline if you have a typo. You can easily paste from Word into LinkedIn. 

IMAGES (in pixels):

Banner – 1584 x 396 (4:1 ratio)

Profile photograph – 400 x 400 to 7680 x 4320 

Group logo – 60 x 60 to 92 x 92 

Article cover image 698 x 400

Company page logo image – 300 x 300

Company page cover image – 1192 x 220

CHARACTER LIMITS (which include spaces, numbers, symbols, and emojis):

First Name – 20 

Last name – 40 

Headline – 220

Vanity (custom) URL – 5 to 30 after the www.linkedin.com/in/

Phone number – 25

Address – 1000

Website – 256

Website text – 30

IM section – 25

About – 2600 

Position title – 100 

Position description – 2000 

Recommendations – 3000

Posts – 1300 

Comments – 1250 

Article headline – 100

Articles – 125,000 

Article photo credit – 250

Company name – 100

Company page description – 200 to 1500

Company status update – 700

Personal message invitation – 300

Recorded message – 1 minute

and … you can have a maximum of 30,000 1st level connections

Although there are more  character limits, these are probably the most frequently used. Hope this helps to plan accordingly.

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit with over 6300 members and alumni providing career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today.