How Do You Find Someone's Email Address That is Not on LinkedIn?

If not listed on LinkedIn, how do you find someone's email address?

So, how do you go about finding someone’s email address?

It’s perplexing to me why some people do not include their email and phone on their LinkedIn profile. 

Shouldn’t it be easy to contact someone for a job or to do business with them?

If it’s not listed on LinkedIn, you may need to know how to find someone’s email so you can contact them. 

So, where should you have your email address on display? One place is under the Contact Info section. Many people also include it at the bottom of their About section. 

If you look at my profile (link in BIO below), you will see that I add the email between the less than <<<  and greater than >>> signs. 

Why do I do that? Some people on LinkedIn violate the user agreement, and they are using a third-party app to scan profiles. So, my hunch is that this technique is one that attempts to hack any hackers. 

Here are another couple of email tips for LinkedIn. 

On LinkedIn, I logon with one email and have another one visible on my profile. Although I could do two-factor authentication, using this system of two emails has so far worked for me.

Here’s the final email suggestion you should implement on your profile. Make sure you have more than one email address on your account in case you get hacked. You will thank me for the time it will save you if this ever happens. 

First, click on the round ME at the top and then click on Settings and Privacy. Next, click on Sign in and security on the left and then Email addresses on the right. Add at least a secondary email address to your account. 

If someone has not listed their email on their LinkedIn profile, or if you need to verify someone’s email address, you can try these suggestions below.

On another note, many people feel they are going to get spam calls or lose their privacy by publishing their phone number. If that’s the case, get a Google voice number. You can publish this public-facing number on a website, especially for your virtual WFH business. The Google voice calls can be forwarded to another phone, like your cell.

Make it easy for people to contact you!

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, that provides career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today

Getting Hired for a Job on Clubhouse is Possible

getting hired for your dream job can start on clubhouse

The goal is getting hired. If you are seeking your dream job and think it can’t start on Clubhouse, think again. Getting hired is possible as you network on Clubhouse to land a job.

Erik’s story of getting hired began with him asking to speak on the stage in a Clubhouse room. He had an interview the next morning at 8 AM. An offer followed that interview in less than three weeks. 

On February 3rd, I was listening in a Clubhouse room while I was making dinner. The live conversation was focused on Erik Corzberg telling his story about how he landed a job by being on Clubhouse.

This career move was a reinvention based on personality and transferable skills.

Erik will be a Commercial Sales Rep for SecurityScorecard, an organization that protects tech companies from hackers by managing their global cybersecurity risks. 

Over the last ten years, Erik grew a staffing business from zero to $4M in sales by closing deals with companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple. When COVID hit, business was not as plentiful. 

Erik had developed a keen interest in Software as a Service (SaaS). He had a pretty good knowledge of technology and applications and thought it would be a perfect move in his career to sell software.

Last year, he spent a lot of time engaging on LinkedIn to make connections, create content, and he posted every day.

Also, Erik set up many Zoom coffees with others who were out of work and with people employed in SaaS.  

Erik noted that in the last four weeks, lightbulbs kept going off in his head. He became highly motivated in his job search and read books and listened to podcasts. He immersed himself in circles of people in sales and SaaS, especially in Clubhouse rooms. 

One night, he met some folks on Clubhouse and, a week later, these individuals were in the same room when he announced he was looking for a job in SaaS. Someone else mentioned they were looking to hire. Erik was immediately supported by his new Clubhouse friends in this room of only about 20 people. By speaking up, he had an offer for an 8 AM interview the next morning. 

This situation is remarkable, as Erik has only been on Clubhouse for a month. He had spent about 10 to 20 hours a week on this voice-only platform, continuing to network, not knowing if he would land a job or not. 

Be positive!

He felt he needed to keep on going and continue to be positive while listening to many conversations by the “brilliant and wonderful people” he met. 

He took lots of notes from the sales, management, and motivation tips people shared. Another strategy he used was to follow every person in the room and then tapped on the bell on their profile so he could choose to be notified when that person spoke “always.” “sometimes,” and “never ever.”  

After the room concluded, Erik followed up on LinkedIn, connecting with all the people in the room. Then he took it a step further and created custom 30-second videos on Vidyard and sent them out to some people he met and before any interview. 

This brilliant 30-second video technique is what we learned from one of our previous speakers, Trevor Houston. Follow his #whoyaknow hashtag and join in on his show.

Thank people!

A tip Erik wanted to share is to make sure you thank people for their time. Also, thank them even if you get a call back when they note you were not the company’s first choice. With a gracious thank you, it may keep the communications open for the future. 

Other tips he offered was to negotiate your salary and never undervalue yourself. 

If you need to learn more about Clubhouse, read this and this, which are the previous two week’s articles. Please note that the first article was incorrectly published as Are You Part of LinkedIn’s Clubhouse? and should have been Are You Part of LinkedIn’s Clubhouse Conversation? 

If you are not on Clubhouse and seek a job or clients, maybe it’s time to download that app if you have an iPhone or an iPad and follow the #clubhouse hashtag on LinkedIn. 

If you need to learn more about LinkedIn, sign up for the third Saturday of the month in 2021 for a three house workshop on Zoom.

Your Clubhouse BIO vs. Your LinkedIn Headline

Should Your Clubhouse BIO match your LinkedIn Headline?

Clubhouse BIO vs. LinkedIn headline – should they match or not?

Clubhouse keeps gaining popularity, and it’s inspiring at the same time that it’s a time suck, though a potential lead magnet for entrepreneurs.

However, it is not just for entrepreneurs. There are clubs for job seekers, nonprofits, social media, hobbies, and vocational and personal interests. Seek, and ye shall find. 

Your Clubhouse BIOs vs. your LinkedIn headlines – so why do do some people not include them?

You will also find celebrities and influencers on the platform, but you must access it from an iPhone or an iPad. They do not have the platform ready yet for Androids. 

So how do you find what you are looking for, specifically? It is not by hashtags. Clubhouse searches are based on keywords and emojis. Yes, that’s right, emojis. You get to have fun and show your creativity.

Don’t write in paragraphs on the platform, either. People’s eyes will glaze over. Short bullets, white space, and sections are what is happening in BIOs. People are creating sections through the use of lines with words or emojis:

__________ word __________          __________ emoji __________

The first three lines are the most critical, though. That’s where you want to pack it with keywords about what you do. The headline of 220 characters on LinkedIn is similar to the first three lines on Clubhouse.

After you create your first three lines on Clubhouse, go back to the magnifying glass at the top left and enter the keyword(s) you chose to see how you rank. 

As you know, it’s a beautiful thing to be ranked on the first page of Google, and the same goes for Clubhouse. 

So how do you determine your best keywords for these platforms? Do your research and test and tweak and modify accordingly. There are a couple of articles I previously wrote about keywords for LinkedIn here and here, so apply the same principles to Clubhouse.

There are some links for emojis in this previously published article, as well as search on emojipedia.  

Had I not participated in the Welcome Room, the Town Hall with the founders of Clubhouse, and a special club to discuss BIOs, I would never have known about what is termed as “knowledge bombs” regarding the BIO that people are dropping.  

People freely share their expertise on this platform to gain followers on Twitter, Instagram, websites, LinkedIn, and other platforms. You can list the links in your BIO, but they are not clickable hyperlinks.

When you get to speak on the platform, people look at your profile, and you may gain followers. Also, you can ask for advice or share your own knowledge bombs in the areas of your expertise. Here are the latest statistics about Clubhouse

You need to use your real first and last name, but your handle can either be your name or your branded handle that you use on other social media. 

If you are not on Clubhouse yet, download the app from the app store and snag your handle. Someone you know may invite you in. 

As you participate on the platform, you will get invites to invite others. 

As previously mentioned in last week’s article, you may want to jazz up the background behind your profile picture for your Clubhouse photo. If so, check out Profile Picture Maker. Some folks are rebranding themselves on LinkedIn with this same more colorful photo, while others are not. 

Have you read the previous article about Clubhouse?

Have fun with those emojis!

Over 300 Powerful Action Verbs for Your Career Documents

Powerful action verbs - do you need a list? Here is a list of 300 powerful action verbs, which are essential for your career documents.

Over 300 powerful action verbs – These accomplishment verbs are essential for your career documents and provide clarity and create impact. 

You can start your bullet points under your positions with these powerful and unique verbs. These verbs will help catch your reader’s attention and note your accomplishments. 

Ensure in your previous jobs you use verbs in the past tense. You may use verbs in the present tense for ongoing responsibilities and verbs in the past tense for projects that you have already accomplished in your current position.

Here is an alphabetical list of over 300 verbs that might help you with your resume and LinkedIn profile. 

Adapted

Administrated

Advanced

Aligned

Amplified

Analyzed

Approved

Arbitrated

Architected

Arranged

Assembled

Attained

Attracted

Audited

Augmented

Authored

Automated

Balanced

Boosted

Brainstormed

Briefed

Budgeted

Built

Calculated

Campaigned

Capitalized

Captured

Catapulted

Centralized

Chaired

Championed

Charted

Clarified

Classified

Coached

Coded

Codeveloped

Cofounded

Collaborated

Collected

Communicated

Completed

Complied

Composed

Conceptualized

Conducted

Configured

Conserved

Consolidated

Constructed

Controlled

Converged

Converted

Conveyed

Convinced

Cooperated

Coordinated

Corrected

Crafted

Created

Cultivated

Curated

Customized

Deciphered

Decreased

Defended

Delivered

Demonstrated

Deployed

Derived

Designed

Detected

Developed

Devised

Diagnosed

Diagrammed

Differentiated

Directed

Discerned

Discovered

Dispensed

Distinguished

Distributed

Documented

Doubled

Drafted

Drew

Drove

Earned

Edited

Educated

Eliminated

Empowered

Enabled

Enacted

Endeavored

Endorsed

Enforced

Engineered

Enhanced

Enlivened

Ensured

Equalized

Established

Evaluated

Exceeded

Excelled

Executed

Expanded

Expedited

Extracted

Facilitated

Finalized

Followed up

Forecasted

Forged

Formalized

Formed

Formulated

Fostered

Founded

Fulfilled

Furthered

Gained

Generated

Governed

Guided

Halted

Handled

Headed

Hired

Identified

Illustrated

Imagined

Implemented

Improved

Improvised

Incorporated

Increased

Influenced

Initiated

Innovated

Inspired

Installed

Instituted

Instructed

Integrated

Intensified

Introduced

Invented

Investigated

Invigorated

Landed

Launched

Led

Leveraged

Lowered

Maintained

Managed

Manufactured

Masterminded

Maximized

Mentored

Merged

Modeled

Modified

Monitored

Motivated

Multiplied

Narrowed

Negotiated 

Networked

Operated

Optimized

Orchestrated

Ordered

Organized

Originated

Outpaced

Outperformed

Outsourced

Overcame

Overhauled

Oversaw

Partnered

Paved

Performed

Piloted

Pinpointed

Pioneered

Planned

Positioned

Predicted

Prepared

Presented

Prevented

Processed

Procured

Produced

Programmed

Promoted

Proofread

Proposed

Provided

Published

Purchased

Qualified

Quantified

Raised

Ran

Re-engineered

Reached

Rebuilt

Reclaimed

Recognized

Recommended

Reconciled

Recovered

Rectified

Redefined

Redesigned

Reduced

Refined

Refocused

Refreshed

Regulated

Related

Remodeled

Renovated

Reorganized

Repaired

Replaced

Research

Researched

Resolved

Restored

Restructured

Revised

Revitalized

Rewrote

Salvaged

Satisfied

Saved

Scheduled

Secured

Served

Services

Set up

Shaped

Sharpened

Shattered

Simplified

Sold

Solved

Sparked

Spearheaded

Specialized

Spoke

Started

Steered

Stimulated

Storyboarded

Strategized

Streamlined

Strengthened

Stressed

Stretched

Structured

Succeeded

Superseded

Supervised

Supported

Surpassed

Sustained

Tailored

Teamed up

Terminated

Tested

Traced

Tracked

Traded

Trained

Transferred

Transformed

Translated

Translated

Trimmed

Tripled

Troubleshot

Uncovered

Unified

Unraveled

Updated

Upgraded

Utilized

Vacated

Validated

Valuated

Verified

Visualized

Volunteered

Withdrew

Won

Worked

Wrote

Yielded

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, that provides career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today

Behavioral Interview Questions

Behavioral interview questions are impossible to memorize so you have to prepare for your interview with STAR stories

There are 100 common interview questions, of which approximately 12 interview questions are designed to destroy you.

Also, there are thousands of behavioral interview questions (BIQs). It is impossible to memorize them.

Many of the Fortune companies only use BIQs to identify promising candidates, allowing them to tell a story of their background and how it matches their job requirements.

Behavioral interview questions usually start with:

“Tell me about a time …” or “Describe specific situations you have been in …” where you have to demonstrate specific skills.

Often, the questions revolve around soft skills, such as Teamwork (ability to work with others).  An example is “Tell me about a time when you faced conflict with a team member?” 

Adaptability. “Describe a time when your company was undergoing a major change?”

Motivation. “Describe a time when you saw a problem and took the initiative ?”

Communication skills. ”Give me an example of a time you were able to persuade someone to see things your way at work?”

Problem-solving. “ Tell me about a problem you solved and were rewarded for it by your manager or company?”

Don’t be intimidated!

Prepare for your interview by analyzing both the hard and soft skills needed for the positions you are applying for at companies.

Practice! Practice! Practice!

Be brief and be truthful.

The best solution to behavioral interview questions is to use the mnemonic acronym, STAR.

Situation 

What is sought here is the circumstance and context around the event. Usually, a sentence or phrase should be enough to set the stage.

Task 

Briefly summarize the dilemma or describe the main objective. This section should rarely exceed a single sentence.

Action 

Explain what specific course of action you (not the team) took in pursuit of the task. Although this part is essential, the critical element is the result.

Result 

Describe what the action taken did, both in terms of the successful resolution of the situation and its impact on the organization. Use metrics as often as possible. This part is essential because it is what will explain what makes YOU a STAR.

Author BIO

Les Segarnick (The Interview Doctor) is an accomplished recruitment expert, volunteer, and instructor. He has established himself as a well-respected advisor to professionals seeking new job opportunities. Since retiring as President and Owner of Action Employment Services, a national recruiting firm that he owned and led for more than three decades, Les has focused his efforts on sharing his knowledge and expertise in the areas of interview techniques and job search strategies through a wide array of volunteer activities. He is currently serving as a facilitator of career development and job search workshops and regularly spends time conducting one-on-one practice interviews with people in job transition, at no charge. Visit the events calendar for his Friday workshops.

Les has also lectured in a variety of classroom settings on such topics as elevator pitch, resume critique, interview techniques, job search strategies, networking, and the importance of using keywords . He has spoken to Juniors and Seniors at the Fox School of Business at Temple University on job and internships searches.

Through his experience as a hands-on owner of a national recruiting firm, Les was personally involved in more than 3,500 job placements and over 1000 practice interviews. His company specialized in engineering, sales, and marketing, and successfully placed professionals throughout Western New York and around the country. Known as the “The Interview Doctor,” his motto is “Ask Me How I Make a Difference.”

Clubhouse is a hot trend in LinkedIn conversations

Clubhouse a hot trend in LinkedIn conversations and where the cool kids are congregating. You can find it by following #clubhouse

 Are you part of Clubhouse? It’s the hottest trend on LinkedIn, but is not part of LinkedIn. Clubhouse is what the cool kids are discussing. You can find it on LinkedIn by following the hashtag #clubhouse.

You will find celebrities participating on this 24/7 platform. Note that these celebrities are not incognito, as everyone needs to use their real name. 

The Clubhouse platform is in beta mode, yet it seems to be the hottest new social media app that is audio-based and brings together people worldwide. 

It’s like a live interactive podcast and radio talk show, though you must be invited to speak by the club’s moderator.

People are meeting, connecting, sharing stories, viewpoints, chatting, teaching, learning, networking, making new friends, etc.

Currently, it is only available for iPhones and iPads with a download from the app store. You will have to wait if you are an Android user. The developers, Paul Davison and Rohan Seth, need to hire more programmers to build for the droids.  

According to CNBC, by May 2020, with only 1500 users, it was already valued at $100 million. It is now reported to have over 600K users as of December 2020. 

The beauty of this platform is that you can multitask – aka listen and work on other things. When you participate in clubs or run your own club, you earn invites to invite others. I tend to listen while I cook!

If you don’t get an invite yourself, you can download the app from the App Store and enter your profile and hope someone will sponsor you. If you have an invite, you can gain access. When you set up your BIO, you can add some pizzazz by including emojis. 

Note that the website is bare-bones at joinclubhouse.com. The team uses the app notion.so for their productivity workspace documents. Notion is a competitor to Evernote

There is the good, the bad, and the ugly on Clubhouse.

Some experts freely share their knowledge, and you will leave with new nuggets of wisdom or inspiration. 

You will attend other sessions that are, let’s say, meh. People share what you already know, so you leave empty-handed and wonder why you wasted your time.

And then there are the ugly sessions where people spew knowledge of what they know, but they really don’t know what they don’t know. There may be others exhibiting inappropriate behavior or hate speech and, in that case, are removed.

Please read and understand their Community Guidelines

There have even been music jamming sessions where people are sharing their musical talents.

Here is an excellent Clubhouse Intro from John Esperian, who explains all of the basics with some visuals.

You might want to join the Welcome room on Wednesdays and also the Town Hall on Sundays.

Just know that the maximum amount if people in a room is 5000 and they have reached that on occasion.

Are you wondering why you have a little party hat on your profile? That identifies you as a new member in the first seven days.

If you want to jazz up the background behind your profile picture for your Clubhouse photo, check out Profile Picture Maker

So, I hope you can get on Clubhouse and see what all the buzz is about these days on LinkedIn and other social media.

When you do, make sure you follow people and clubs that are in your interest area so the algorithm knows what to suggest to you.

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, that provides career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today

Networking Online & Offline Requires a Positive Mindset

Networking Online & Offline Requires a Positive Mindset

When networking with others in online meetings or on LinkedIn, Meetup, or on other platforms, you need to leave your pessimistic attitude, words, and writings behind.

Be an optimist!

Even though the pandemic has wreaked havoc on jobs, businesses, mental health, finances, and more, no one wants to hang with Debbie or Donnie Downer. 

No one wants to help Negative Nancy or Ned. 

I’m sure you have heard the expression that you catch more flies with sugar than vinegar. It’s not an old wives tale but is the truth. 

Focus on having a positive attitude and a positive mindset. Yes, it’s hard at times, especially when you ride emotional rollercoasters.

Networking is all about building relationships with know, like, and trust. 

When you hear rotten garbage coming out of your mouth or off the end of your fingers as you type, take a deep breath and pause, and regroup. 

Do you think people will LIKE you if you spew negativity? Do you think they will want to help you? They will probably not want to add your baggage on top of their own. Save that for a therapy session and not for networking. 

Have EQ and be emotionally intelligent and self-aware. Start your day with positive affirmations and turn any negative self-talk into positive self-talk. 

According to Positive Psychology, “Positive thinking is a mental and emotional attitude that focuses on the bright side of life and expects positive results.” It includes optimism, acceptance, resilience, gratitude, mindfulness, and integrity and the article includes 89 ways that you can strive to achieve positivity in your mental attitude.Speaking of attitude, here is one of my favorite quotes on attitude by Charles Swindoll that I posted on LinkedIn. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.  

Stay positive, everyone!

AUTHOR BIO

Lynne Williams is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Area Great Careers Group, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, that provides career education and networking. Lynne also writes for vista.today, montco.today, and delco.today